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Thread: Is the Elks Lodge a cult?

  1. #1
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    Default Is the Elks Lodge a cult?

    I"m asking because I know about the masons but what about the Elks Lodge? Does anyone know? We saw the "secret meeting room" and it gave me the creeps. Maybe its nothing.. I would prefer to find that out but something tells me, 4 permanent throne like chairs facing each other in a square with a "table" at the center and a few other things I wont mention.. my discernment meter went off but I could be very wrong.

    Anyone know about them???

  2. #2
    Amber Lynne Guest

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    I know nothing about them, but it sounds creepy to me.

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    My father was a member of the Elks, and he was a band-leader, when they had dances. He said it was just more of a 'leisure club' than anything else.


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  4. #4
    Traveling Through Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshine2777 View Post
    I"m asking because I know about the masons but what about the Elks Lodge? Does anyone know? We saw the "secret meeting room" and it gave me the creeps. Maybe its nothing.. I would prefer to find that out but something tells me, 4 permanent throne like chairs facing each other in a square with a "table" at the center and a few other things I wont mention.. my discernment meter went off but I could be very wrong.

    Anyone know about them???
    Thank you for this question. I got a good chuckle that started my day off right.

    My father-in-law is an Exalted Ruler at a local Elks Club. To begin with, the Elks Club is a charity-patriotic social club. They provide scholarships to high school students, support to the abuse shelters, support hoop shoots for pre-teens, and have numerous awards to students. Much of the money they bring in goes to charity. People are not really interested in charity groups these days and many clubs around the nation are having a problem just keeping their doors open. Many clubs are closing. The members aren't there now.

    At this Elks Club, even members don't want to get involved with running the club. They want a place to come to drink and eat with friends and nothing else. Therefore, my father-in-law has to get members of his family to fill posts. My wife fills a couple of positions and I am an Esquire, a drafted Esquire, I may add. There was no volunteering on my part to fill the position.

    The only initiation requirement is that members must swear to a belief in God. There is a chaplain post to say a prayer at a meeting and other events. Secret room? It is only secret to members who don't want to attend meetings. I assure you these same membes have no problem finding the dining room. If you saw the meeting room, it can't be very secret. As for throne-like chairs? We have none like this. We have only hard wood chairs which make sure people stay awake during the meetings. I can't swear about throne-like chairs in other clubs.

    However, there is no inner sanctum with pentagrams on the wall or an altar on which we sacrifice chickens or anything else.

    Well, I think you get the picture. If you find anything weird at another Elks Club, let me know. I would be very surprised.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Through View Post
    Thank you for this question. I got a good chuckle that started my day off right.

    My father-in-law is an Exalted Ruler at a local Elks Club. To begin with, the Elks Club is a charity-patriotic social club. They provide scholarships to high school students, support to the abuse shelters, support hoop shoots for pre-teens, and have numerous awards to students. Much of the money they bring in goes to charity. People are not really interested in charity groups these days and many clubs around the nation are having a problem just keeping their doors open. Many clubs are closing. The members aren't there now.

    At this Elks Club, even members don't want to get involved with running the club. They want a place to come to drink and eat with friends and nothing else. Therefore, my father-in-law has to get members of his family to fill posts. My wife fills a couple of positions and I am an Esquire, a drafted Esquire, I may add. There was no volunteering on my part to fill the position.

    The only initiation requirement is that members must swear to a belief in God. There is a chaplain post to say a prayer at a meeting and other events. Secret room? It is only secret to members who don't want to attend meetings. I assure you these same membes have no problem finding the dining room. As for throne-like chairs? We have none like this. We have only hard wood chairs which make sure people stay awake during the meetings. I can't swear about throne-like chairs in other clubs.

    However, there is no inner sanctum with pentagrams on the wall or an altar on which we sacrifice chickens or anything else.

    Well, I think you get the picture. If you find anything weird at another Elks Club, let me know. I would be very surprised.
    I sincerely hope you are right but alot of what you described ALSO describes the Freemasons. So I was looking for inside information if anyone had researched them. Knowing someone who is a member isnt exactly what I was looking for. You'll get the same info from a member of the Freemasons. And there is more to them than meets the eye. Alot more. I'm you got a laugh and, like I said, I hope you are 100% right. But if you saw the setup of this room and were familiar with the masons activities, them you would understand my concern. And the way I described the room... my discernment meter is still kicking on high.

    Anyone else?

  6. #6
    TomSki Guest

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    They're a drinking club as far as I know - I live within walking distance of an Elks club and sometimes they leave the parking lot having been faithful to their order (pulling out of the club under the influence).

  7. #7
    Traveling Through Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshine2777 View Post
    I sincerely hope you are right but alot of what you described ALSO describes the Freemasons. So I was looking for inside information if anyone had researched them. Knowing someone who is a member isnt exactly what I was looking for. You'll get the same info from a member of the Freemasons. And there is more to them than meets the eye. Alot more. I'm you got a laugh and, like I said, I hope you are 100% right. But if you saw the setup of this room and were familiar with the masons activities, them you would understand my concern. And the way I described the room... my discernment meter is still kicking on high.

    Anyone else?
    An officer of an Elks Club isn't what you are looking for to get information on the Elks Club? Are you looking for information or confirmation of your discernment meter? If you had concerns about the "secret meeting room" you should have asked at that time. I have no idea what you saw since you haven't said.

    Let me ask a question. Where is this Elks Club located?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Through View Post
    An officer of an Elks Club isn't what you are looking for to get information on the Elks Club? Are you looking for information or confirmation of your discernment meter? If you had concerns about the "secret meeting room" you should have asked at that time. I have no idea what you saw since you haven't said.

    Let me ask a question. Where is this Elks Club located?
    It is located in Arkansas.

    And no, you dont ask a member or an officer of any kind of group like that about info. Usually valid information will come from believers who have been in such an organization, come out of it and will explain in detail why they came out of it. For example, the Freemasons.... if a group is secretive, they are NOT going to tell an outsider anything, if there is something to tell....

  9. #9
    Traveling Through Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshine2777 View Post
    It is located in Arkansas.

    And no, you dont ask a member or an officer of any kind of group like that about info. Usually valid information will come from believers who have been in such an organization, come out of it and will explain in detail why they came out of it. For example, the Freemasons.... if a group is secretive, they are NOT going to tell an outsider anything, if there is something to tell....
    This is exactly how urban legends get started. If you want to give me the exact location of this club, I can contact them and ask them about their setup. To restate what I said before, I am an officer of an Elks Club, and I haven't officiated in any sacrifices for at least two weeks. So, we are safe enough for the moment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Through View Post
    This is exactly how urban legends get started. If you want to give me the exact location of this club, I can contact them and ask them about their setup. To restate what I said before, I am an officer of an Elks Club, and I haven't officiated in any sacrifices for at least two weeks. So, we are safe enough for the moment.
    I am not trying to start any "urban legend". I am looking for information from an independent source, not from a member. You have not even mentioned my references to the similarities to the Freemasons, which make question things even more. I am honestly just trying to find out truth and my intention was never to start "something" or get into a disagreement. And please leave the sarcasm out of it.

    Tell me: Which God do you swear a belief in when you join? What are the exact words of the oath?

  11. #11
    Traveling Through Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshine2777 View Post
    I am not trying to start any "urban legend". I am looking for information from an independent source, not from a member. You have not even mentioned my references to the similarities to the Freemasons, which make question things even more. I am honestly just trying to find out truth and my intention was never to start "something" or get into a disagreement. And please leave the sarcasm out of it.

    Tell me: Which God do you swear a belief in when you join? What are the exact words of the oath?
    You might find more information to your liking at this website,

    http://www.phoenixmasonry.org/masoni...alism/elks.htm

    Would it help you if I said that Jesus Christ is the Son of God who died for my sins and arose again on the third day and now sits by the side of God , His Father? If that is enough to convince you that I am a Christian, you may rest assured that God wouldn't allow me to participate in ungodly things.

    The God that we say we must believe in is the only God, and that is the Lord of Hosts, not any of his creation. I realize that we are in difficult times, but we must be careful that we don't become paranoid.

    Again, if you have cause for concern, talk to the people there. God is on your side. He won't allow you to be harmed.

  12. #12
    Yeshuaiscomingback Guest

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    I am not an elk whatever,I googled it and I found :

    http://www.elks.org/

    may be it helps? good info?? dont know,you judge,blessings in JESUS

  13. #13
    TomSki Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Through View Post
    You might find more information to your liking at this website,

    http://www.phoenixmasonry.org/masoni...alism/elks.htm

    Would it help you if I said that Jesus Christ is the Son of God who died for my sins and arose again on the third day and now sits by the side of God , His Father? If that is enough to convince you that I am a Christian, you may rest assured that God wouldn't allow me to participate in ungodly things.

    The God that we say we must believe in is the only God, and that is the Lord of Hosts, not any of his creation. I realize that we are in difficult times, but we must be careful that we don't become paranoid.

    Again, if you have cause for concern, talk to the people there. God is on your side. He won't allow you to be harmed.
    "Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:" (1 Peter 5:8)

    There are several verses in the Bible that would warn the Christian to be on his guard and warry of deceit. If paranoia means that we examine everything by the Bible - go ahead and be paranoid - this is about survival.

    That website you posted is all one needs to confirm the Satanic nature of Freemasonry and, from the page on the Elks, it appears that the Elks are related to Masonry - it appears they believe and teach the lie of the universal brotherhood of man.

    "What I tell you in darkness, that speak ye in light: and what ye hear in the ear, that preach ye upon the housetops." (Matthew 10:27)

    I believe that no Christian should belong to ANY secret, fraternal organization.

  14. #14

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    An ex-BF's grandmother was a memeber of the Elk place near where I live--assuming it's the same organization. Now, I've never been to any of their meetings, and know nothing other than what she said about it. I know that she really enjoyed going there. They did a lot of charity work--collecting toys for children around Christmas, collecting canned food items were two things they did regularly. I know that they would have dinners and other social gatherings sometimes to raise $ for something going on.
    “My Father's will is that everyone who looks to the Son and believes in him shall have eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day.” (John 6:40)


    BTW, my son is now in the 8th grade!

  15. #15
    Traveling Through Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomSki View Post
    "Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:" (1 Peter 5:8)

    There are several verses in the Bible that would warn the Christian to be on his guard and warry of deceit. If paranoia means that we examine everything by the Bible - go ahead and be paranoid - this is about survival.

    That website you posted is all one needs to confirm the Satanic nature of Freemasonry and, from the page on the Elks, it appears that the Elks are related to Masonry - it appears they believe and teach the lie of the universal brotherhood of man.

    "What I tell you in darkness, that speak ye in light: and what ye hear in the ear, that preach ye upon the housetops." (Matthew 10:27)

    I believe that no Christian should belong to ANY secret, fraternal organization.
    "I believe that no Christian should belong to ANY secret, fraternal organization. "

    What do you think is secret about it? As far as teaching anything, I am not aware of any classes or religious seminars being conducted by the Elks. It is a charity rather than religious organization. Elks must confirm they believe in God. Is there something wrong with members believing in God? Elks strongly support the veterans and America. No religion is pushed, neither is anything that violates the personal principles of the members. It isn't a secret handshake type of organization.

  16. #16
    yogi3939 Guest

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    I went to their site and here is their mission statement. It looks pretty harmless but as we well know even a harmless organization can be perverted at the local level.

    Our Mission

    To inculcate the principles of Charity, Justice, Brotherly Love and Fidelity; to recognize a belief in God; to promote the welfare and enhance the happiness of its Members; to quicken the spirit of American patriotism; to cultivate good fellowship; to perpetuate itself as a fraternal organization, and to provide for its government, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the United States of America will serve the people and communities through benevolent programs, demonstrating that Elks Care and Elks Share.

  17. #17
    TomSki Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Through View Post
    "I believe that no Christian should belong to ANY secret, fraternal organization. "

    What do you think is secret about it? As far as teaching anything, I am not aware of any classes or religious seminars being conducted by the Elks. It also isn't a religious organization. Elks must confirm they believe in God. Is there something wrong with members believing in God?
    Who is the god the Elks require you to believe in? If a Muslim joins, is his god the same god all Elks acknowledge? The Freemasons require the same thing to join, but the spirit whom the Freemasons honor as "god" is not the God of the Bible. Christians are not brothers to Muslims, Hindus and pagans - our God is not their god, too.

    The Elks have an altar which they lay the Bible, just as the Freemasons do - from what I've been reading, they, too, have rituals and handshakes - yeah, what is so secret about it?

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    We have one in town and basicly it is a bar where they do community work so non-drinkers will not throw a fit. I have only entered their place for inspections but never found anything that would cause me to question if they are voo doo do'er
    I know a few guys that are members and the dressing up in robes, wearing funny hats or standing on one leg while speaking a private message is by far not their cup of tea. So locally they are just a private drinking club.

  19. #19
    TomSki Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex View Post
    We have one in town and basicly it is a bar where they do community work so non-drinkers will not throw a fit. I have only entered their place for inspections but never found anything that would cause me to question if they are voo doo do'er
    That's what I thought, too...just a drinking club. But now, a drinking club that requires you to believe in "God". If so, Christians should steer clear of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshine2777 View Post
    I"m asking because I know about the masons but what about the Elks Lodge? Does anyone know? We saw the "secret meeting room" and it gave me the creeps. Maybe its nothing.. I would prefer to find that out but something tells me, 4 permanent throne like chairs facing each other in a square with a "table" at the center and a few other things I wont mention.. my discernment meter went off but I could be very wrong.

    Anyone know about them???
    The Elks Lodge would be nothing without the Moose Club

    The Elks came about because the New York State Legislature passed a law closing saloons on Sundays back in 1866. Hard drinking actors and writers were understandably upset.

    A group of thespians took it upon themselves to set up a social club that would allow its members to drink booze on Sundays. AND SO THIS GROUP OF ACTORS RENTED OUT A ROOM ON FOURTH STREET (AND LATER BROADWAY) WHERE THEY FELT FREE TO LIVE-IT-UP.

    The society that sprang up around this was initially called The Jolly Corks, and a cork was used to initiate new members into the group. A Jolly Cork had to carry a cork at all times on his person or else he would be forced to pay for a round of drinks.

    The idea of getting drunk on a Sunday soon caught on, and the Jolly Corks started to initiate members from outside the theatrical and literary professions. The loyal Corks realized that with this sudden influx of new people, they would need to find a more dignified and respectable sounding name.

    As the debate over what to call themselves was raging, a group of Corks went to see some animal heads put on display by P.T. Barnum. They rushed back to the Corks Lodge and informed their boozing buddies "Hey guys! We've got it! People will look up to us if we call ourselves THE ELKS!"

    An official ELKS pamphlet explains the significance of the name. "The animal from which the Order took its name was chosen because of a number of its attributes were deemed typical of those to be cultivated by members of the fraternity. The elk is a distinctly American animal. It habitually lives in herds. The largest of our native quadrupeds, it is yet fleet of foot and graceful in movement. It is quick and keen of perception; and while it is usually gentle and even timorous, it is strong and valiant in defense of its own." -from page 7 of WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN ELK

    Actually, the largest native quadruped would be a moose or buffalo, but The Moose have a separate fraternity of their own.

    As for the herd mentality, one of the major distinctions of the Elks is their blind patriotism and unconditional love of the United States. Every meeting in an Elks lodge devotes time to honoring the flag, and Flag Day is an important Elks event. At the same time, it is forbidden to discuss politics at Elks meetings. To create an atmosphere of brotherhood among beer guzzling quadrupeds, religion and politics are officially kept out. Remember, good civic virtue means we can all agree to prostrate ourselves before armed serviceman and the flag!

    As late as the 1960's (and much later than that in actual practice) the Elks were officially open only to "Adult members of the Caucasian or White race." This racism is quite common among fraternal organizations, most of which refused to admit Africans throughout their history (see FREEMASONS, below) The Elks were particularly zealous about maintaining their racial "purity." Because of their nationalistic orientation, only US. citizens are allowed to become Elks. In 1898 a man named Alfred E. Riggs organized the first lodge of Negro Elks. The Negro Elks grew to include some 300,000 members, but were never recognized as legitimate by other Elks.

    The Elks initiation ceremony is simple, and there is only one degree. Certain aspects of Elk-dom borrow heavily from Masonic tradition, such as the designated "Tyler" who guards the lodge, and the :Lodge of Sorrow" held for a deceased Elk.
    Elk jewelry
    http://www.phoenixmasonry.org/masoni...alism/elks.htm

    Elk initiation
    The rituals continue with a review of the cardinal tenets of the Order: Brotherly Love, Justice,
    Charity, and Fidelity. A legend about the gods on Olympus is used to teach that Charity is the
    greatest of all virtues. As a symbol of the patriotism fostered by the Order, a Flag is presented
    to the candidate. The recitation of the poem Thanatopsis at the conclusion of the initiation is
    optional.
    Evaluation from a Lutheran Theological Perspective
    The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod recognizes with appreciation the significant contributions
    made by the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks to the common good in our society and nation.
    Through its institutions and programs the Elks’ Lodge has had a commendable history of providing
    support and encouragement not only for the members of the fraternity and their families, but also for
    the citizens of our nation in times of crisis and need

    We appreciate the Lodge’s desire to avoid introducing anything into the Order that is “of a political or
    sectarian character,” and its efforts to assure its members that there would be nothing in their
    membership obligations that would conflict with an individual’s religious convictions. Unfortunately,
    however, the many overtly religious elements that permeate the official rites and rituals of the Lodge
    reveal a religious perspective that in our judgment conflicts with the biblical teaching on key spiritual
    truths, and that, in fact, is contrary to the scriptural Gospel of Jesus Christ.

    The ceremonies reviewed above speak, and without discrimination, of the entry of all Elks upon death
    into an eternal fellowship in the presence of God. The ceremonies suggest that an unspecified “belief in
    God” and adherence to the principles of the Order (Charity, Justice, Brotherly Love and Fidelity) are
    instrumental for the attainment of eternal peace in heaven and reunion with other Elks. However, the
    heart of the biblical Gospel is that eternal life is given by God only to those who confess and believe in
    Jesus Christ, the Son of God and the only Savior of the world (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 4:12). As St. Paul
    states with unparalleled clarity, “For there is no distinction: for all have sinned and fall short of the
    glory of God, and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,
    whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith…for we hold that one is
    justified by faith apart from the works of the law” (Rom.3:22-25, 28). As Jesus Himself said, “I am the
    way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me” (emphasis added; John
    14:6). Good works indeed are necessary in the Christian’s life, but as the fruit of a living faith in
    Christ—and not as a contributing factor in a person’s salvation (Gal. 2:16; 5:22-23).

    The Elks’ ritual speaks of God’s “redeeming grace,” but nowhere is the revelation of God’s redeeming
    grace in Jesus Christ even mentioned. One can understand why the Lodge’s rituals would omit any
    reference to Jesus Christ, lest in its view “sectarian” views be introduced and its universalist or
    religiously all-inclusive perspective be compromised. But to introduce the hope of eternal life, either
    implicitly or explicitly, without mention of the Savior is itself sectarian—and in a way that is patently
    offensive to confessing Christians. Moreover, from a Lutheran perspective, for the Bible to occupy
    such a central emblematic role in the Lodge’s rituals and in a religious context, without even the
    slightest acknowledgement of its central purpose (2 Tim. 3:15; Rom. 15:4ff.), indeed turns the Holy
    Scriptures into a “book of Law” and thus a book without hope.

    In offering this perspective we are mindful of our Lord’s admonition, “So everyone who acknowledges
    me before men, I also will acknowledge before my Father who is in heaven, but whoever denies me
    before men, I also will deny before my Father who is in heaven” (Matt. 10:32-33). It is out of a sincere
    pastoral concern for the spiritual well-being of those for whom Christ died that we present the above
    evaluation. Public commitment, in the words of a solemn oath, to tenets that compromise a Christian’s
    witness to the truth of the Gospel is always a matter of serious spiritual import and cannot, in our view,
    be taken lightly



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