Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Asherah Pole

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    268

    Default Asherah Pole

    Does anybody have a good website that explains what the Asherah Pole is?

    Since it is repeated throughout the Old Testament, I'm assuming it is not only important for us to understand and avoid it but I suspect there is a connection to some end time event. I know the Queen of Heaven is a title this goddess (Asherah) is given which ties her to the Catholic Mary; is there anything else I'm missing?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    332

    Default

    Here is a good article on idolatry in general.

    http://ldolphin.org/idolatry.html

    There is a part on Asherah about halfway down.

    Asherah

    She was the wife of El in Ugaritic mythology, and is the goddess who is also called Athirau-Yammi: "She Who Walks on (or in) the Sea". She was the chief goddess of Tyre in the 15th century BC, and bore the appellation qudshu, "holiness." In the OT Asherah appears as a goddess by the side of Baal, whose consort she evidently became, at least among the Canaanites of the south. However, most biblical references to the name point obviously to some cult object of wood, which might be cut down and burned, possibly the goddesses' image (1 Kings 15:13, 2 King 21:7). Her prophets are mentioned (1 Kings 18:19), and the vessels used in her service referred to (2 Kings 23:4). The existence of numerous symbols, in each of which the goddess was believed to be immanent, led to the creation of numerous forms of her person, which were described as Asherim. The cult object itself, whatever it was, was utterly detestable to faithful worshipers of Yahweh (1 Kings 15:13), and was set up on the high places beside the "alters of incense" (hammanim) and the "stone pillars" (masseboth). The translation of asherah by "grove" in some translations follows a singular tradition preserved in the LXX and the Vulgate which apparently connects the goddess' image with the usual place of its adoration.
    My understanding is that the Asherah poles were <umm> phallic in nature.
    Think Heavenly
    Act Locally

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    332

    Default

    Also this is from the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia

    Asherah
    a-shē´ra, ash´er-im (אשׁרה, 'ăshērāh; ἄλσος, álsos, mistranslated “grove” in the King James Version, after the Septuagint and Vulgate):
    1. References to the Goddess
    2. Assyrian Origin of the Goddess
    3. Her Symbol
    4. The Attributes of the Goddess
    Was the name of a goddess whose worship was widely spread throughout Syria and Canaan; plural Asherim.
    1. References to the Goddess
    Her “image” is mentioned in the Old Testament (1Ki_15:13; 2Ki_21:7; 2Ch_15:16), as well as her “prophets” (1Ki_18:19) and the vessels used in her service (2Ki_23:4). In Assyria the name appears under the two forms of Asratu and Asirtu; it was to Asratu that a monument found near Diarbekir was dedicated on behalf of Khammu-rabi (Amraphel) “king of the Amorites,” and the Amorite king of whom we hear so much in Tell el-Amarna Letters bears the name indifferently of EbedAsrati and Ebed-Asirti.
    2. Assyrian Origin of the Goddess
    Like so much else in Canaanite religion, the name and worship of Asherah were borrowed from Assyria. She was the wife of the war-god Asir whose name was identified with that of the city of. Assur with the result that he became the national god of Assyria. Since Asirtu was merely the feminine form of Asir, “the superintendent” or “leader,” it is probable that it was originally an epithet of Ishtar (Ashtoreth) of Nineveh. In the West, however, Asherah and Ashtoreth came to be distinguished from one another, Asherah being exclusively the goddess of fertility, whereas Ashtoreth passed into a moon-goddess.
    3. Her Symbol
    In Assyrian asirtu, which appears also under the forms asrātu, esrēti (plural) and asru, had the further signification of “sanctuary.” Originally Asirtu, the wife of Asir, and asirtu, “sanctuary,” seem to have had no connection with one another, but the identity in the pronunciation of the two words caused them to be identified in signification, and as the tree-trunk or cone of stone which symbolized Asherah was regarded as a Beth-el or “house of the deity,” wherein the goddess was immanent, the word Asirtu, Asherah, came to denote the symbol of the goddess. The trunk of the tree was often provided with branches, and assumed the form of the tree of life. It was as a trunk, however, that it was forbidden to be erected by the side of “the altar of Yahweh” (Deu_16:21; see Jdg_6:25, Jdg_6:28, Jdg_6:30; 2Ki_23:6). Accordingly the symbol made for Asherah by his mother was “cut down” by Asa (1Ki_15:13). So, too, we hear of Asherim or symbols of the goddess being set up on the high places under the shade of a green tree (Jer_17:2; see 2Ki_17:10). Manasseh introduced one into the temple at Jerusalem (2Ki_21:3, 2Ki_21:7).
    4. The Attributes of the Goddess
    Asherah was the goddess of fertility, and thus represented the Babylonian Ishtar in her character as goddess of love and not of war. In one of the cuneiform tablets found at Taanach by Dr. Sellin, and written by one Canaanite sheikh to another shortly before the Israelite invasion of Palestine, reference is made to “the finger of Asherah” from which oracles were derived. The “finger” seems to signify the symbol of the goddess; at any rate it revealed the future by means of a “sign and oracle.” The practice is probably alluded to in Hos_4:12. The existence of numerous symbols in each of which the goddess was believed to be immanent led to the creation of numerous forms of the goddess herself, which, after the analogy of the Ashtaroth, were described collectively as the Asherim.
    Think Heavenly
    Act Locally

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    268

    Default

    Thanks, Paidfor.

    I'd already seen the Lambert Dolphin piece but the ISB encyclopedia information was interesting. I thought there might be some connection to this whole Catholic Mary thing but I guess there's another reason it is repeated over and over in the OT. The "tree of life" reference is interesting...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    sticks ar us
    Posts
    2,662

    Default

    http://freedom.greatnet.us/washmon.htm

    This would be a good example of a modern day asherah pole. It has to do with fertility and the phallus.

    here is a site about it: http://altreligion.about.com/library...entpagan26.htm

    The Pillar or Dolmen is continually linked with sacred trees, and the association forms a part of Druidical worship.

    In the cult of Asherah it might be either a living tree or an artificially constructed pole or post before which the Canaanites placed their altars.

    The Tower is an outgrowth of the pillar and the Round Towers of Ireland, supposed by some to have been built by Persian refugees, and attributed by others to the Gynosophists, a society founded on Buddhism and driven out of India by the Brahmins, probably belonged to this form of worship.
    http://www.matrifocus.com/LAM04/spotlight.htm

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    268

    Default

    AH, yes...the obelisk. Did you know there is an obelisk in St. Peter's Square in the Vatican?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Peter's_Square

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/egypt/raising/world.html

    What is it with this, anyway???

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •