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Movie Review: Horton Hears a Who slams homeschooling

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  • Movie Review: Horton Hears a Who slams homeschooling

    Hi everyone, I just wanted to let everyone know about the new kid's movie "Horton Hears a Who". We got a free pass to it and brought our kids to it Friday night and were disappointed with it's portrayal of homeschooling. (They added a lot that wasn't in the book) I just thought we'd let you know what's in it so you can make an informed decision before seeing it.

    The main "evil" character is the kangaroo - a narrow-minded, controlling homeschooling mom who wants to destroy Horton and his new found friends because of it's threat to the way things are in their jungle society.
    Horton is a teacher of jungle kids - fun and silly.
    Kangaroo's son asks sadly from her pouch "Mom, why can't I play with the other kids?" and she explains to the other moms
    that she "Pouch-schools" and is portrayed as a narrow-minded, cold, controlling fanatic who is constantly telling her son to "go to his room" as she shoves his head down into her pouch and tells him continually that whatever is happening doesn't concern him. She goes to a vulture to have Horton and his little world of friends destroyed - when discussing what to do for payment, the vulture wants her son in exchange for doing what she asks. Her son is frightened and looks
    to her for protection - she shuts him up and tells him "I'm thinking about it..." It is very clear that her motives throughout the film were not done out of love for her child, but out of a desperate need to control ideas and keep the authority/tradition of her world from being threatened. My husband and I both felt that it was far from subtle against homeschooling - the negative stereotypes of homeschoolers were sprinkled throughout. I don't know what's better -
    to boycott it or see it and write a letter to the movie producers. I wanted to write this because I would have liked to have known what was in it before seeing it.
    God bless you all in your last few months of the school year.

  • #2
    Thats truly sad and pathetic.

    Thanks for the review

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by denny272 View Post
      Hi everyone, I just wanted to let everyone know about the new kid's movie "Horton Hears a Who". We got a free pass to it and brought our kids to it Friday night and were disappointed with it's portrayal of homeschooling. (They added a lot that wasn't in the book) I just thought we'd let you know what's in it so you can make an informed decision before seeing it.

      The main "evil" character is the kangaroo - a narrow-minded, controlling homeschooling mom who wants to destroy Horton and his new found friends because of it's threat to the way things are in their jungle society.
      Horton is a teacher of jungle kids - fun and silly.
      Kangaroo's son asks sadly from her pouch "Mom, why can't I play with the other kids?" and she explains to the other moms
      that she "Pouch-schools" and is portrayed as a narrow-minded, cold, controlling fanatic who is constantly telling her son to "go to his room" as she shoves his head down into her pouch and tells him continually that whatever is happening doesn't concern him. She goes to a vulture to have Horton and his little world of friends destroyed - when discussing what to do for payment, the vulture wants her son in exchange for doing what she asks. Her son is frightened and looks
      to her for protection - she shuts him up and tells him "I'm thinking about it..." It is very clear that her motives throughout the film were not done out of love for her child, but out of a desperate need to control ideas and keep the authority/tradition of her world from being threatened. My husband and I both felt that it was far from subtle against homeschooling - the negative stereotypes of homeschoolers were sprinkled throughout. I don't know what's better -
      to boycott it or see it and write a letter to the movie producers. I wanted to write this because I would have liked to have known what was in it before seeing it.
      God bless you all in your last few months of the school year.
      We saw the movie this past weekend. I agree that the kangaroo was controlling, and a bit scary to think of as a mother figure. But, I never felt the movie was slamming homeschooling. The kangaroo was just a fictional character, with some pretty questionable personality traits... but in the end, when Horton saw her standing alone...and offered his friendship...that was beautiful. I never read the book, so didn't really know what to expect. My kiddos loved the movie, by the way.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the heads-up.

        Comment


        • #5
          weird, the reviews i read of it didn't pick up anything like that

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          • #6
            I have not seen the movie yet. My teenage son did yesterday and he loved it. He probably did not view the "knock" on homeschooling.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the heads up.

              Comment


              • #8
                We saw it has a family and we loved it. I thought it was a wonderful story.

                Yes I got the part about homeschool but as a homeschooling mom (I stopped just this fall, long story) I had to laugh at it. I have met mom's like that who home school and some who send their kids to private and public that act like that so it didn't bother me at all. But you have to remember to the outside world we might seem like this, that is just their impression. I could give examples but we all know other that look down on someone else just because they hold to a different standard. That's just the way the world works.

                As for the story it was a wonderful story and made me think of how much God loves us; that amazing little speck was cared for and protected. No one else could hear it/ see it but that doesn't mean it didn't exisit. A lovely story.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the review *sigh*

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes thank you for the review i second that *sigh*

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I took my two middle children (ages 6 and 7) to this movie as well. I have homeschooled my children and also had them in the public school system. I have met "kangaroo" moms in both venues. I felt that the movie was in effect better in some ways than the book as the baby kangaroo in the movie wanted to help Horton whereas the baby kangaroo in the book is just as narrow and closed as his mother! My children enjoyed the movie. It did have some questionable content other than the "pouch-schooling"! (ponies that poop butterflies... I got to hear that one over and over) Irregardless, the moral was there: "A person's a person, no matter how small!"

                      Comment

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