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  • Lenovo Legion Y520

    A little over half a year ago i wanted one of my kids who is off to college to have a backup computer in case something went wrong with the one they had (hardware failure, software corruption, virus, ransomware, etc.). I decided to give him my almost 2 year old Toshiba, a notebook that I really, really liked. I then looked to replace that Toshiba. Toshiba had stopped making notebooks, which I was sad about because I was a big fan of their notebooks. They made nice packages that were priced for the value market. Alack and alas, I purchased what I thought would be a good notebook, an HP Pavilion with the following specs:

    Intel i7-7500U CPU
    16 GB DDR4 memory
    2 TB hard drive
    GeForce 940MX Video Card

    I've never been disappointed with the i7, and this one was a few generations newer than the Toshiba I'd given my son. This one also had the video card so I thought this would be a decent system. Well, it took a few times longer from boot to being ready to use than the Toshiba, and that got me concerned. I like a quick boot... and this HP reminded me of the old days... I lived with it for a few months and then when I went to use some video editing software for the first time I learned that the system couldn't quite handle that... Very disappointed, I decided that perhaps the 2 core CPU was at least partly to blame and maybe HP just did a poor job unifying the components they used in the notebook. Thus, when I saw that Costco had a Lenovo notebook (a brand I'd never planned to purchase) with about the same specs as a desktop I'd just purchased for a client, I convinced myself to purchase it. It is a Lenovo Legion Y520 with the following Specs:

    Intel i7 7700 HQ (4 Core)
    16 GB DDR4 memory
    256 GB Samsung SSD
    2 TB Hard Drive
    GeForce 1050 GTX Ti

    A good ways back IBM sold it's notebook line to Lenovo. I'd decided back then that I'd stay away from Lenovo... but I've never trusted Dell notebooks, this HP had failed me, and my favored Toshiba had stopped building and selling them...

    Will, I love this Lenovo. It is ready to use in 6 or 7 seconds after I press the power button. The sleep function works flawlessly and wakes up instantly. It advertises poor battery life but seems to last as long as the HP battery even though HP says its battery will last up to 8 hours while the Lenovo only claims up to 4 hours. And the Lenovo has plenty of power. It has a keyboard with a tactile feel probably better than any notebook I've ever owned (and I've gone through a lot of them).

    The inclusion of an SSD makes a big difference, and I knew that it would, but the HP was really a poor build. Insomuch as the CPU might be to blame, I think Intel should have never put the i7500U on the market.
    Tall Timbers, Imperfect but forgiven

    3 trees

  • #2
    I won't buy Lenovo as they are a Chinese company. I don't trust them.

    My daughter has a decent Dell that we bought for her about 3 years ago for college. She used it to earn her Bachelor's degree and is now working on her Master's degree with it. It's been a good laptop.

    I only use Dell now, but I use desktops exclusively. I always bought HP but those computers never lasted me more than a year and a half. I've had my Dell desktop now for a while and it is working fine.

    I personally would rather use an American company than the Chinese Lenovo. But then again I'm kind of anti-Chinese anyway, except for when it comes to Chinese food. They do get that right. LOL

    On another note, I wouldn't buy a computer from a Russian company either.
    Rapture Forums Ministries - Rapture Forums

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    • #3
      That's how I felt about Lenovo... still do down deep, but I'm glad I have this computer. I don't trust the Chinese. I've never been fond of Dell so I stay away. Dell sells a lot of junk and it all seems to get refurbished and resold. I often pretty much had to buy hundreds of Dell desktops for the organizations I worked for so I've been well exposed to Dell. I've had a lot of HP notebooks and have liked them until this last one that I rejected after 6 months. I build my own personal desktops.

      I guess the guts all come from the same companies. I wouldn't trade this Lenovo for any other notebook I've ever had... I do like it. On the other side of that coin, some Chinese intelligence analyst is probably getting more sleep than usual
      Tall Timbers, Imperfect but forgiven

      3 trees

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      • #4
        I've been buying Lenovos at work since I've been here (4 years now) and they have been great. Lenovo desktops and laptops are made in North Carolina and their executive headquarters is located there.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Shonsu View Post
          I've been buying Lenovos at work since I've been here (4 years now) and they have been great. Lenovo desktops and laptops are made in North Carolina and their executive headquarters is located there.
          Lenovo is a Chinese company that purchased the IBM Thinkpad division. I guess they got the IBM North Carolina facility with the purchase. Their corporate headquarters is in Hong Kong, I believe. The Morrisville facility is an operational, research, and sales center. Morrisville isn't listed as one of their manufacturing centers.

          Are they made there or maybe just sold from there? I'd think about Lenovo a bit differently if the notebooks were assembled in North Carolina...
          Tall Timbers, Imperfect but forgiven

          3 trees

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tall Timbers View Post
            Lenovo is a Chinese company that purchased the IBM Thinkpad division. I guess they got the IBM North Carolina facility with the purchase. Their corporate headquarters is in Hong Kong, I believe. The Morrisville facility is an operational, research, and sales center. Morrisville isn't listed as one of their manufacturing centers.

            Are they made there or maybe just sold from there? I'd think about Lenovo a bit differently if the notebooks were assembled in North Carolina...

            I was going by the Wikipedia info on them.

            It says at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenovo#Corporate_affairs: "The company executive headquarters are in Morrisville, North Carolina, near Raleigh in the Research Triangle metropolitan area, in the United States"

            And at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenovo#Operations: "In October 2012, Lenovo announced that it would start assembling computers in Whitsett, North Carolina. Production of desktop and laptop computers, including the ThinkPad Helix began in January 2013."

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            • #7
              Tall Timbers,

              Thank you for sharingb your observation. My wife and I have used Toshiba notebooks for eighteen years. This one is my fourth, and since hearing about Toshiba's discontinuance I've wondered what I might buy to replace it. My principle application besides MS Office is Bible Works. So, I don't need a system that supports demanding applications.

              By far most computer electronic devices are made in China anyway, often in the same factory as their competitors. So, I don't think that puts Lenovo in such bad light. For a long time it's been, buy Asian or do without.

              But then the question, how did we ever conduct our lives without computers, smartphones and GPS devices?

              Marvin

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Shonsu View Post
                I was going by the Wikipedia info on them.

                It says at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenovo#Corporate_affairs: "The company executive headquarters are in Morrisville, North Carolina, near Raleigh in the Research Triangle metropolitan area, in the United States"

                And at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenovo#Operations: "In October 2012, Lenovo announced that it would start assembling computers in Whitsett, North Carolina. Production of desktop and laptop computers, including the ThinkPad Helix began in January 2013."
                Thanks, Shonsu! I gleamed mine from the Lenovo corporate website. Morrisville is probably their HQ for North America.

                I just queried the net regarding Whitsett...

                Source http://www.npr.org/2013/06/06/189057...assembly-plant

                Chinese computer maker Lenovo celebrated the opening of its first U.S. manufacturing plant in Whitsett, N.C., on Wednesday. The company is trying to boost its brand and U.S. market share. Other high-tech firms, including Motorola, have announced plans to manufacture in the U.S.

                The Lenovo plant celebration was a patriotic affair. A large sign was on display featuring the American flag and the words "Assembled in the U.S."

                The article is dated 2013

                *****************

                Mine is assembled in China according to the sticker on the backside, The HP that I replaced says "made in China".
                Tall Timbers, Imperfect but forgiven

                3 trees

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by G Moorish View Post
                  Tall Timbers,

                  Thank you for sharingb your observation. My wife and I have used Toshiba notebooks for eighteen years. This one is my fourth, and since hearing about Toshiba's discontinuance I've wondered what I might buy to replace it. My principle application besides MS Office is Bible Works. So, I don't need a system that supports demanding applications.

                  By far most computer electronic devices are made in China anyway, often in the same factory as their competitors. So, I don't think that puts Lenovo in such bad light. For a long time it's been, buy Asian or do without.

                  But then the question, how did we ever conduct our lives without computers, smartphones and GPS devices?

                  Marvin
                  For bang for the buck, Toshiba led the pack. I was buying Toshibas in the $600-$700 range, ones that had full retail prices of about $900-$1000 dollars. My college student kids all have Toshibas, as does my last high schooler.

                  When it comes time for you to start shopping for your next notebook, the first question I would ask is, do you mind waiting? Waiting for the computer to boot, come out of sleep mode, turn off... I've never liked waiting for my computer... that's probably why I upgrade frequently. Our existing Toshibas are all ready to use in about 10-15 seconds. My newest HP which has a 7th generation Intel chip, is ready in about 40 seconds, and for me that was intolerable. It would have been awesome in 1990, but it's slow as molasses today. I think Intel pressed too hard for low energy use in the i7-7500U and I'm guessing that HP married the CPU to a cheap MOBO and together it doesn't make for a decent system. Only two cores probably adds to my dissatisfaction with it. If you don't mind waiting for the computer for a short time you can probably pay less for a decent HP that will be more than fine for you. This Lenovo is ready to work in just several seconds and comes out of sleep mode practically instantaneously, which makes me so pleased that I'm tending to use the notebook while ignoring the desktop I normally use when I'm at home.
                  Tall Timbers, Imperfect but forgiven

                  3 trees

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tall Timbers View Post
                    For bang for the buck, Toshiba led the pack. I was buying Toshibas in the $600-$700 range, ones that had full retail prices of about $900-$1000 dollars. My college student kids all have Toshibas, as does my last high schooler.

                    When it comes time for you to start shopping for your next notebook, the first question I would ask is, do you mind waiting? Waiting for the computer to boot, come out of sleep mode, turn off... I've never liked waiting for my computer... that's probably why I upgrade frequently. Our existing Toshibas are all ready to use in about 10-15 seconds. My newest HP which has a 7th generation Intel chip, is ready in about 40 seconds, and for me that was intolerable. It would have been awesome in 1990, but it's slow as molasses today. I think Intel pressed too hard for low energy use in the i7-7500U and I'm guessing that HP married the CPU to a cheap MOBO and together it doesn't make for a decent system. Only two cores probably adds to my dissatisfaction with it. If you don't mind waiting for the computer for a short time you can probably pay less for a decent HP that will be more than fine for you. This Lenovo is ready to work in just several seconds and comes out of sleep mode practically instantaneously, which makes me so pleased that I'm tending to use the notebook while ignoring the desktop I normally use when I'm at home.
                    I have a 4 year old Toshiba LS955 and I love it, super fast, best computer we have ever owned. A young man I worked with knew much about computers and said he would order me a laptop. He ordered it built with options or internals I do not understand, stating I would probably never tax it's ability, and it is a gem.
                    John 10:27-30 My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one will snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand. I and the Father are one.

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