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  • The Blood Moon Theory

    On August 28, the Moon will plunge through Earth's shadow, and the United States' West Coast sees the best show.



    The spectacular eclipse occurs the morning of August 28. Circumstances favor observers west of the Mississippi, who missed out on the March lunar eclipse. Better still, this event marks the first central lunar eclipse since 2000.

    A central eclipse is one where part of the Moon passes through the center of Earth's shadow. This results in a longer-lasting eclipse, and it likely will result in a more darkly colored Moon at totality. The Moon's northern edge passes through the shadow's center, which means its northern half will look noticeably darker than its southern half.

    The penumbral part of the eclipse begins at 3:54 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. The first hint of shadow won't be visible to East Coast observers until at least 4:30 a.m. Watch the Moon low in the southwest as the limb near Oceanus Procellarum gradually darkens.


    The lunar eclipse August 28 will give observers 90 minutes of totality — 15 minutes more than the eclipse last March. The reason: The Moon penetrates more deeply into the darkest part of Earth's shadow thhis month. Astronomy: Roen Kelly [larger image]
    The umbral eclipse phase begins at 4:51 a.m. EDT. It takes an hour for the Moon to fully enter Earth's shadow. But by the time it does, twilight brightens the sky. For observers on the East Coast, the Moon sets while totally eclipsed.

    The farther west you go, the higher the Moon's altitude during totality. West of the Rockies, observers see all but the eclipse's final penumbral stages. Totality begins at 4:52 a.m. Central Daylight Time, and mideclipse occurs at 5:37 a.m. CDT.

    Try estimating the Moon's darkness at mideclipse. French astronomer André Louis Danjon (1890–1967) devised a simple scale for comparing the depth of lunar eclipses. It runs from 0 (the Moon is almost invisible) to 4 (the Moon is a bright, coppery red). See sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse for more details.

    The Midwest will see totality in a gradually brightening sky, with the Moon 6° high by totality's end. From cities like Denver, perched along the Great Divide's eastern edge, observers may find mountains block the view during the eclipse's later stages.

    The West Coast will see the eclipse in its entirety and high in the sky, well placed for observing. In Hawaii, the eclipse occurs near local midnight August 27/28.







    Original Article

  • #2
    Looks cool! Makes me think of my walk with God. I am meant to be a reflection of the brightness and glory of the Son.Just like the moon reflects the brightness and glory of the sun.As long as I keep focused on the Son all is well. However if I lose my focus and let the world distract me, then I lose my brightness and I reflect the world more than the Son. Just a thought.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Aknightwhosezni View Post
      On August 28, the Moon will plunge through Earth's shadow, and the United States' West Coast sees the best show.



      The spectacular eclipse occurs the morning of August 28. Circumstances favor observers west of the Mississippi, who missed out on the March lunar eclipse. Better still, this event marks the first central lunar eclipse since 2000.

      A central eclipse is one where part of the Moon passes through the center of Earth's shadow. This results in a longer-lasting eclipse, and it likely will result in a more darkly colored Moon at totality. The Moon's northern edge passes through the shadow's center, which means its northern half will look noticeably darker than its southern half.

      The penumbral part of the eclipse begins at 3:54 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. The first hint of shadow won't be visible to East Coast observers until at least 4:30 a.m. Watch the Moon low in the southwest as the limb near Oceanus Procellarum gradually darkens.


      The lunar eclipse August 28 will give observers 90 minutes of totality — 15 minutes more than the eclipse last March. The reason: The Moon penetrates more deeply into the darkest part of Earth's shadow thhis month. Astronomy: Roen Kelly [larger image]
      The umbral eclipse phase begins at 4:51 a.m. EDT. It takes an hour for the Moon to fully enter Earth's shadow. But by the time it does, twilight brightens the sky. For observers on the East Coast, the Moon sets while totally eclipsed.

      The farther west you go, the higher the Moon's altitude during totality. West of the Rockies, observers see all but the eclipse's final penumbral stages. Totality begins at 4:52 a.m. Central Daylight Time, and mideclipse occurs at 5:37 a.m. CDT.

      Try estimating the Moon's darkness at mideclipse. French astronomer André Louis Danjon (1890–1967) devised a simple scale for comparing the depth of lunar eclipses. It runs from 0 (the Moon is almost invisible) to 4 (the Moon is a bright, coppery red). See sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse for more details.

      The Midwest will see totality in a gradually brightening sky, with the Moon 6° high by totality's end. From cities like Denver, perched along the Great Divide's eastern edge, observers may find mountains block the view during the eclipse's later stages.

      The West Coast will see the eclipse in its entirety and high in the sky, well placed for observing. In Hawaii, the eclipse occurs near local midnight August 27/28.







      Original Article

      What a totally awesome sight that will be!? Why shoot! I would give an arm and an leg to see that... especially onboard Royal Caribbean's Monarch of the Seas! When you're on the sea, nothing but sea fog seems to block your view.

      After shoving off from San Diego precisely at 5:30 p.m. (PDT), and during the wee hours of every Tuesday, from San Diego, she heads for Santa Catalina Island, to drop anchor off of the coast of Avalon Harbor. Viewing this spectacular sight from onboard ship, could be seen either her topside, which is on either Deck 11 (which is the pool deck) or 12, or portside from your outside cabin's porthole window.
      Last edited by SisterNChrist; August 25th, 2007, 04:50 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by AllforHim View Post
        Looks cool! Makes me think of my walk with God. I am meant to be a reflection of the brightness and glory of the Son.Just like the moon reflects the brightness and glory of the sun.As long as I keep focused on the Son all is well. However if I lose my focus and let the world distract me, then I lose my brightness and I reflect the world more than the Son. Just a thought.
        Are you familiar with the music group watermark?
        There is One King, and He is not this guy. sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Sorry

          Dont think so, maybe I know something they sing though. Why?


          Ok carry on with the topic

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by AllforHim View Post
            Sorry

            Dont think so, maybe I know something they sing though. Why?


            Ok carry on with the topic
            Going with your post and how the moon looks because of the influences. Made me think of a group called Watermark. Their website explained their name "Watermark" meant "an impression that is not visible until it is held up to the light." Yes, they are believers.
            There is One King, and He is not this guy. sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Sounds good, will look up their website, thanks I was just posting the thoughts that came to my mind as I looked at the photo and read the post. Would like to see it but I'm not west of the mississippi

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by AllforHim View Post
                Looks cool! Makes me think of my walk with God. I am meant to be a reflection of the brightness and glory of the Son.Just like the moon reflects the brightness and glory of the sun.As long as I keep focused on the Son all is well. However if I lose my focus and let the world distract me, then I lose my brightness and I reflect the world more than the Son. Just a thought.
                That really touched me. Thanks for sharing that.

                As for the article....

                [rant on]

                I don't know who wrote it...but I had the hardest time following it. I'm so confused with all the time zones they kept mentioning. First you say the west coast will have the best view...then you start talking in East coast time.
                Ok fine, I'll calculate it from EST, no biggie. THEN you switch to central time and I'm having to recalculate it. So now I'm trying to figure the whole things path and how long it will last but I'm so confused by the times zones and I don't feel like putting it all together anyway. And....

                <sigh>

                [/rant off]


                Other than that, I'm looking forward to seeing this! Seems like there's a couple things to be watching for this upcoming week. First the eclipse...then the 2000 year old meteor shower.

                Signs in the sun, moon and stars indeed!! :jazz

                Psalm 3:3
                But You, Oh Lord, are a shield about me;
                My glory, and the One who lifts my head.

                Comment


                • #9
                  AllforHim that was so well said!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was driving home the other evening and saw a red moon. Pretty Cool!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Tonight, actually right now, I'm looking out the window and the moon is very red. I'm here on the East Coast. Cool!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Are you implying some connection to:
                        Joel 2:31 The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of Jehovah cometh.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LisaB View Post
                          I'm so confused with all the time zones they kept mentioning. First you say the west coast will have the best view...then you start talking in East coast time.
                          Ok fine, I'll calculate it from EST, no biggie. THEN you switch to central time and I'm having to recalculate it. So now I'm trying to figure the whole things path and how long it will last but I'm so confused by the times zones and I don't feel like putting it all together anyway. And....
                          It will last about 90 minutes.

                          The umbral eclipse phase begins at 4:51 a.m. EDT. It takes an hour for the Moon to fully enter Earth's shadow. But by the time it does, twilight brightens the sky. For observers on the East Coast, the Moon sets while totally eclipsed.
                          4:51 Eastern
                          3:51 Central
                          2:51 Mountain
                          1:51 Pacific


                          The farther west you go, the higher the Moon's altitude during totality. West of the Rockies, observers see all but the eclipse's final penumbral stages. Totality begins at 4:52 a.m. Central Daylight Time, and mideclipse occurs at 5:37 a.m. CDT.
                          5:52 Eastern
                          4:52 Central
                          3:52 Mountain
                          2:52 Pacific

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BlessHisName View Post
                            It will last about 90 minutes.



                            4:51 Eastern
                            3:51 Central
                            2:51 Mountain
                            1:51 Pacific




                            5:52 Eastern
                            4:52 Central
                            3:52 Mountain
                            2:52 Pacific
                            See?...now that's so clear and concise! Why couldn't the guy write it like that? Or at least pick one time zone and stick with it!

                            Thanks BlessHisName!
                            I coulda figured it...but I was too lazy!

                            Psalm 3:3
                            But You, Oh Lord, are a shield about me;
                            My glory, and the One who lifts my head.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Don't know if this is the same...

                              but I received an email months ago to watch the moon on August 27th, I even put it on my calendar to remind myself. But then, I got another email stating it was an urban legend according to snopes.com here's the link:

                              http://www.snopes.com/science/mars.asp

                              Again, I don't know if it's the same thing, but the dates are so close and they're both "moon" events.

                              Comment

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