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Volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupts in rural southern Iceland, homes evacuated and emergency declared

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  • Satellite image of volcano ash plume:

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    • This is all so weird. Everything that is happening with this volcano, earthquakes, Obama and his agenda.... weird lights in the sky....yikes.... Scary, but exciting. Wow is all I can say, as I am a bit overwhelmed at the moment.
      Blessings to all,
      savedatcamp

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      • Originally posted by savedatcamp View Post
        This is all so weird. Everything that is happening with this volcano, earthquakes, Obama and his agenda.... weird lights in the sky....yikes.... Scary, but exciting. Wow is all I can say, as I am a bit overwhelmed at the moment.
        Blessings to all,
        savedatcamp

        I know what you mean Savedatcamp, when I logged on just now and saw 134 viewers here, I thought...something must be up and no doubt Zerozx & Megan are on top of it, so I check here and dont even bother with news websites....until later.....it's just too much to keep up with!!!!!

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        • Updated - Icelandic volcano eruption intensifies - http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE63E2OU20100416

          (Reuters) - A volcanic eruption in Iceland, which has thrown up a 6-km (3.7 mile) high plume of ash and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, has grown more intense, an expert said on Thursday.

          The eruption under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier continued to spew large amounts of ash and smoke into the air and showed no signs of abating after 40 hours of activity, said Pall Einarsson, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland.

          "The seismographs are showing that since this morning the intensity of the eruption seems to be growing," he said.

          Hot fumes had melted up to a third of the glacial ice covering the crater, causing a nearby river to burst its banks, and frequent explosions on the floor of the crater sounded like bombs going off, he said.

          The floods were abating, however, and some of those living in the sparsely populated area near the volcano had returned to their homes.

          Another scientist said the eruption was 10 times more powerful than one which occurred last month on the flank of the volcano, though the two were part of the same event.

          To the east of the volcano, thousands of hectares of land are covered by a thick layer of ash while a cloud blotted out the sun in some areas along the southern coast of Iceland, local media reported.

          The cloud of ash from the eruption has hit air travel all over northern Europe, with flights grounded or diverted due to the risk of engine damage from sucking in particles of ash from the volcanic cloud.

          CLOSE WATCH

          Scientists picked up the first signs of increased seismic activity at Eyjafjallajokull last summer and had been expecting an eruption at any moment, Einarsson said.

          The eruption began in March but subsided earlier this week when a magma conduit became blocked, building up pressure which finally escaped through the volcano's main crater.

          Einarsson, who described the eruption as "reasonably powerful," said it was the most significant volcanic event in Iceland since a huge eruption in 1996, when an eruption under the Grimsvotn lakes led to widespread flooding.

          He said scientists were still concerned the ongoing eruption could trigger Mt Katla, a more powerful volcano nearby covered by a thicker ice sheet, but had not picked up any clear signs of brewing activity.

          The volcano under the Ejfjallajokull glacier, Iceland's fifth largest glacier, has erupted five times since Iceland was settled in the ninth century.

          Iceland sits on a volcanic hotspot in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and has relatively frequent eruptions, although most occur in sparsely populated areas and pose little danger to people or property. Before March, the last eruption took place in 2004.

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          • Video: http://www.reuters.com/news/video/st...deoId=72616675

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            • That ash looks pretty eerie...

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              • Originally posted by Zerozx View Post
                That ash looks pretty eerie...
                It looks quite tangible.

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                • NATS advises that restrictions will remain in place in UK controlled airspace until 1900 (UK time) today, Friday 16 April

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                  • U.N. health agency: Europeans should stay indoors if ash from Iceland's volcano starts settling - AP

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                    • Netherlands airspace will be closed until 06:00 a.m. local time Saturday

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                      • God has the people in a "time out" for their behavior.

                        They can be still in the airports and maybe some will come to know that HE IS GOD!

                        I am geographically challenged but I wondered if Israel could use this situation for their benefit?
                        The dogs are barking, someone is knocking on the door...

                        Please pray for Lindsey's salvation

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                        • Volcano ash causes Europe flight disruptions to worsen

                          http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2...l_N.htm?csp=34

                          Ice chunks the size of houses tumbled down from a volcano beneath the Eyjafjallajokull (ay-yah-FYAH'-plah-yer-kuh-duhl) glacier Thursday, as hot gases melted the ice. The volcano began erupting Wednesday for the second time in less than a month.
                          The last time the volcano blew the eruption lasted more than a year, from December 1821 until January 1823, says Sally Sennert, a geologist at the Smithsonian Institution.
                          The dogs are barking, someone is knocking on the door...

                          Please pray for Lindsey's salvation

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                          • A YEAR?! This will be interesting to watch.

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                            • Icelandic volcano still spewing huge ash

                              An Icelandic volcano is still spewing ash into the air in a massive plume that has disrupted air traffic across Europe and shows little sign of letting up, officials said on Friday.

                              One expert said the eruption could abate in the coming days, but a government spokesman said ash would keep drifting into the skies of Europe.

                              The thick, dark brown ash cloud has shut down air traffic across northern Europe and restrictions remained in place in many areas. However, Norway said it had resumed some limited flights in the north of the country.

                              "It is more or less the same situation as yesterday, it is still erupting, still exploding, still producing gas," University of Iceland professor Armann Hoskuldsson told Reuters.

                              "We expect it to last for two days or more or something. It cannot continue at this rate for many days. There is a limited amount of magma that can spew out," he added, saying it was the magma, or molten rock beneath the Earth's surface, coming out of the volcano that turned into ash.

                              Environment Ministry spokesman Gudmundur Gudmundsson agreed.

                              "The eruption is ongoing and we are not expecting any change in the production of ash...High level winds will keep dispersing the plume over Europe," he said.

                              The eruption has taken place under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier, normally a popular hiking ground in southern Iceland.

                              Another professor said on Thursday that the heat had melted up to a third of the glacial ice covering the crater, causing a nearby river to burst its banks.

                              Icelandic radio said part of the ring road that goes around the small north Atlantic island had been swept away.

                              To the east of the volcano, thousands of hectares of land are covered by a thick layer of ash.

                              The cloud of ash from the eruption has hit air travel all over northern Europe, with flights grounded or diverted due to the risk of engine damage from sucking in particles of ash from the volcanic cloud.

                              The volcano under the Ejfjallajokull glacier, Iceland's fifth largest glacier, has erupted five times since Iceland was settled in the ninth century.

                              Iceland sits on a volcanic hotspot in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and has relatively frequent eruptions, although most occur in sparsely populated areas and pose little danger to people or property. Before March, the last eruption took place in 2004.
                              http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100416/...celand_volcano

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                              • Originally posted by Megan View Post
                                Icelandic volcano still spewing huge ash

                                http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100416/...celand_volcano

                                An Icelandic volcano is still spewing ash into the air in a massive plume that has disrupted air traffic across Europe and shows little sign of letting up, officials said on Friday.

                                One expert said the eruption could abate in the coming days, but a government spokesman said ash would keep drifting into the skies of Europe.

                                The thick, dark brown ash cloud has shut down air traffic across northern Europe and restrictions remained in place in many areas. However, Norway said it had resumed some limited flights in the north of the country.

                                "It is more or less the same situation as yesterday, it is still erupting, still exploding, still producing gas," University of Iceland professor Armann Hoskuldsson told Reuters.

                                "We expect it to last for two days or more or something. It cannot continue at this rate for many days. There is a limited amount of magma that can spew out," he added, saying it was the magma, or molten rock beneath the Earth's surface, coming out of the volcano that turned into ash.

                                Environment Ministry spokesman Gudmundur Gudmundsson agreed.

                                "The eruption is ongoing and we are not expecting any change in the production of ash...High level winds will keep dispersing the plume over Europe," he said.

                                The eruption has taken place under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier, normally a popular hiking ground in southern Iceland.

                                Another professor said on Thursday that the heat had melted up to a third of the glacial ice covering the crater, causing a nearby river to burst its banks.

                                Icelandic radio said part of the ring road that goes around the small north Atlantic island had been swept away.

                                To the east of the volcano, thousands of hectares of land are covered by a thick layer of ash.

                                The cloud of ash from the eruption has hit air travel all over northern Europe, with flights grounded or diverted due to the risk of engine damage from sucking in particles of ash from the volcanic cloud.

                                The volcano under the Ejfjallajokull glacier, Iceland's fifth largest glacier, has erupted five times since Iceland was settled in the ninth century.

                                Iceland sits on a volcanic hotspot in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and has relatively frequent eruptions, although most occur in sparsely populated areas and pose little danger to people or property. Before March, the last eruption took place in 2004.
                                As bad as this looks and sounds, there is an even worse threat in a nearby volcano that has a history of erupting after the one I won't even try to write the name of and making it look like a pooter in a wind storm. If that happens we will be facing far worse restrictions on air travel for far longer and a climate change that could lead to massive famine from shorter growing seasons and crop failures.

                                If that does indeed happen the only thing that could be worse would be for Yellowstone or one of the other super volcanos to erupt.

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