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  • #31
    http://www.spaceweather.com/

    RADIO-ACTIVE SUNSPOT: "After a long quiet spell, the sun is making noise again," reports Thomas Ashcraft of New Mexico. On Maqy 15th, using a 21 MHz ham rig, he recorded the roaring sounds of a Type III solar radio burst: listen.







    GREENSBURG, KANSAS: Photographer Mike Theiss is a frequent contributor of sky photos to spaceweather.com. A few days ago, he turned his camera from the heavens to Earth during a sobering visit to Greensburg, Kansas, a small town almost completely destroyed by a monster tornado on May 4th.

    "The power of the wind from this EF-5 tornado was evident," says Theiss. "I documented a fork stuck in a tree, a Kansas license plate ripped off a car and stuck in a tree, millions of splintered pieces of wood and much more. There was amazing evidence of winds over 200 mph everywhere." (continued below)

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    • #32
      http://www.spaceweather.com/

      SUNSPOT 963: Over the weekend a new sunspot emerged

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      • #33
        http://www.chicagosuburbannews.com/g...ge/x1663150411

        All signs point to impressive meteor shower Sunday night

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        • #34
          http://www.spaceweather.com/

          PERSEID PEAK: If it's dark where you live, go outside and look up. You may see some Perseid meteors. The shower peaks during the early hours of August 13th with predicted rates as high as 100+ meteors per hour. People in cities will see fewer due to glare from urban lights.




          A solar wind stream flowing from the indicated coronal hole should reach Earth on or about Aug. 15th. Credit: SOHO Extreme Ultraviolet

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          • #35
            Originally posted by lighthouse View Post
            http://www.spaceweather.com/

            PERSEID PEAK: If it's dark where you live, go outside and look up. You may see some Perseid meteors. The shower peaks during the early hours of August 13th with predicted rates as high as 100+ meteors per hour. People in cities will see fewer due to glare from urban lights.




            A solar wind stream flowing from the indicated coronal hole should reach Earth on or about Aug. 15th. Credit: SOHO Extreme Ultraviolet

            Waited, stayed up late...it stunk.

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            • #36
              http://spaceweather.com/

              ANOTHER FIREBALL: "After seeing the September 13th New Mexico fireball on spaceweather.com, I was surprised to catch a very bright fireball here in Texas just two nights later," reports Tom King who operates an all-night, all-sky camera near Watauga, Texas, not far from Dallas/Fort Worth. "In the video, you can see where the meteor is bright enough to illuminate a power pole and trees!"





              METEOR UPDATE: There has been speculation in recent days that meteor activity is more intense than usual--so many fireballs!--and, furthermore, that the constellation Camelopardalis (near the North Star) might be producing more than its fair share. Not so, according to veteran observer Chris Peterson who has been monitoring activity over Colorado using an all-sky camera at the Cloudbait Observatory: "My meteor rate has been about as expected the last few nights, possibly even a little low." Using 23 meteors recorded Sept. 13-15 as data, he calculated 253 possible radiants: plot. "If there really is a current shower with a radiant in Camelopardalis, it is very subtle." Nevertheless, he intends to continue monitoring the nights ahead--just in case.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by lighthouse View Post
                http://spaceweather.com/

                ANOTHER FIREBALL: "After seeing the September 13th New Mexico fireball on spaceweather.com, I was surprised to catch a very bright fireball here in Texas just two nights later," reports Tom King who operates an all-night, all-sky camera near Watauga, Texas, not far from Dallas/Fort Worth. "In the video, you can see where the meteor is bright enough to illuminate a power pole and trees!"





                METEOR UPDATE: There has been speculation in recent days that meteor activity is more intense than usual--so many fireballs!--and, furthermore, that the constellation Camelopardalis (near the North Star) might be producing more than its fair share. Not so, according to veteran observer Chris Peterson who has been monitoring activity over Colorado using an all-sky camera at the Cloudbait Observatory: "My meteor rate has been about as expected the last few nights, possibly even a little low." Using 23 meteors recorded Sept. 13-15 as data, he calculated 253 possible radiants: plot. "If there really is a current shower with a radiant in Camelopardalis, it is very subtle." Nevertheless, he intends to continue monitoring the nights ahead--just in case.
                Did you see this thread, another meteorite in Peru left a BIG hole and "sulfur-like" smell !

                http://www.rr-bb.com/showthread.php?t=14461

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                • #38
                  http://spaceweather.com/

                  Geomagnetic Storms:
                  Probabilities for significant disturbances in Earth's magnetic field are given for three activity levels: active, minor storm, severe storm
                  Updated at: 2007 Sep 30 2203 UTC
                  Mid-latitudes 0-24 hr 24-48 hr
                  ACTIVE 10 % 10 %
                  MINOR 05 % 05 %
                  SEVERE 01 % 01 %

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                  • #39
                    actually all is very quiet

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                    • #40
                      http://www.spaceweather.com/


                      CORONAL HOLE: Japan's Hinode spacecraft is monitoring a large dark hole in the sun's atmosphere--a coronal hole:



                      Coronal holes are vast regions where the sun's magnetic field opens up and and allows solar wind to escape. A solar wind stream issuing from this hole is blowing against Earth now and it could spark a geomagnetic storm. (NOAA forecasters estimate a 10% chance of a severe high-latitude storm during the next 24 hours.) Northern sky watchers should be alert for auroras.


                      http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2...nov_africa.htm


                      Two days before this map was made, an explosion on the sun had hurled a cloud of magnetized gas—a CME—toward Earth. The plume formed when the CME hit, triggering a strong geomagnetic storm. The plume consists of ionized air at high altitude moving from Florida to Canada at a speed of 1 km/s (2200 mph).

                      The purpose of the Workshop is to familiarize African space scientists with the plume phenomenon and lay the groundwork for a continent-wide GPS network. "Within a few years we hope to deploy hundreds of receivers," he says.

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                      • #41
                        SPACE WEATHER
                        Current conditions

                        http://www.spaceweather.com/

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                        • #42
                          Cool! thx for sharing.

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                          • #43
                            http://www.kansascity.com/news/nation/story/412910.html

                            Huge asteroid could be on collision course with Mars
                            By JOHN JOHNSON JR.
                            Los Angeles Times
                            LOS ANGELES | An asteroid similar to the one that flattened forests in Siberia in 1908 could plow into Mars in the next few weeks, scientists say.

                            Researchers attached to NASA’s Near-Earth Objects Program, who like to call themselves the Solar System Defense Team, have been tracking the asteroid for days.

                            The scientists based at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge, Calif., put the chances that it will hit the Red Planet at about one in 300. That is better odds than any known asteroid has ever had of hitting Earth since the Siberian strike, the scientists said.

                            The unnamed asteroid is about 160 feet across, which puts it in the range of the famous Siberian rock. The largest impact in recent history, that explosion felled 80 million trees in an area of 830 square miles.

                            Concerns about another strike on Earth led to the creation of the Near-Earth Objects Program and the pursuit of research into possible ways of deflecting a killer asteroid.

                            Scientists say it is unclear what the effects of such an impact on Mars would be. The Martian atmosphere is so thin that an asteroid would probably plummet all the way to the surface instead of breaking up above ground, as happened in the Siberian event.

                            It would probably create a large crater and send dust high into the atmosphere, scientists said. Depending on where it hit, the plume could be visible through telescopes on Earth.

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                            • #44
                              http://www.spaceweather.com/

                              NEW YEARS COMET: After a 13.6 year absence, Comet 8P/Tuttle is once again traveling through the inner solar system and on Jan. 1st and 2nd it makes its closest approach to Earth--only 24 million miles away. The emerald-colored comet will brighten to a predicted magnitude of 5.8, visible to the unaided eye from dark-sky sites and a fine target for backyard telescopes: sky map.

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                              • #45
                                http://www.time.com/time/health/arti...698526,00.html

                                Finally, the bad news: 2007 WD5 has only a 1-in-75 chance of actually hitting Mars, which means astronomers would be wise to be pessimistic. But the possibility of impact calls to mind a loosely related incident that occurred almost exactly 100 years ago, when something exploded above the Tunguska region of Siberia, flattening trees in a 25-mile radius, their trunks pointing outward from the epicenter of the blast. Scientists are pretty sure it was a comet or asteroid — about the same size as 2007 WD5, as it happens — that disintegrated from its own shock wave as it plowed through the atmosphere. (UFO enthusiasts have long been convinced it was a flying saucer that somehow made it across trillions of miles of interstellar space safely, only to blow up above Russia.) The scientific explanation would account for the aerial explosion, and also the fact that no crater has been found.

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