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Church Cancelled Funeral After Learning Man Was Gay

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  • Church Cancelled Funeral After Learning Man Was Gay

    The family of a gay man says a Tampa church abruptly canceled his funeral service after learning about his sexual orientation.

    Julie Atwood told WFLA-TV the pastor of New Hope Missionary Baptist Church called her the day before her son’s funeral, during the actual wake, to say it could not be held at the church because it would be “blasphemous.”

    “It was devastating,” she said. “I did feel like he was being denied the dignity of death.”

    Atwood said she has family ties to New Hope and also needed the large space to accommodate the hundreds of expected mourners for Julion Evans.

    T.W. Jenkins, pastor at New Hope told WFLA-TV that he did not know Evans was gay until members of his congregation saw the obituary and called to complain.

    “Based on our preaching of the scripture, we would have been in error to allow the service in our church,” Jenkins said. “I’m not trying to condemn anyone’s lifestyle, but at the same time, I am a man of God, and I have to stand up for my principles.”

    http://tampa.cbslocal.com/2014/08/08...g-man-was-gay/
    And having food and raiment let us be therewith content. 1 Timothy 6:8

  • #2
    "Atwood said she has family ties to New Hope and also needed the large space to accommodate the hundreds of expected mourners for Julion Evans."

    This brings a few things to light; the man was not a part of this congregation nor even known by them. Also, the Pastor apparently first agreed to the funeral (without asking about the deceased) before cancelling it. I would think everyone involved would learn from this situation. I have to say I've never really understood someone with no direct ties to a church having a church perform a funeral.

    Thanks to sweeetlilgurlie on Narniaweb for the sig

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    • #3
      They had to know a missionary baptist church might have a problem with it.

      I have to think this was done deliberately in hopes of furthering the gay agenda.

      IMO, I would have had the funeral and preached the gospel. That's just me.

      " I have had an increasing burden to engage in some down and dirty, street evangelism." March 6, 2010

      Isaiah 6:8 I heard the voice of the Lord, saying: “ Whom shall I send, And who will go for Us?”

      Then I said, “Here am I! Send me.”

      Matthew 22:9 NIV
      'So go to the street corners and invite to the banquet anyone you find.’


      I'm praying for you daily!
      I get my Bibles here

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      • #4
        I agree this could very well have been scheduled at this church to further the gay agenda. Gays have made the news, and in some cases admitted they targeted Christians, just so they can make the news and cause trouble for the faithful who adhere to the tenets of their faith despite insistence they abdicate in the name of gay PC.

        That being said, this pastor is in the wrong. First he agreed to do the funeral. And then he revoked his agreement when he found out this man was a sinner. A gay sinner yes, but a sinner is the point.
        Let those without sin cast the first stone.
        This pastor revoked mercy to the dead. A man who is now to be judged by God and for whom no one can say would not receive God's mercy should God choose.
        Meanwhile, the living, as in this departed man's partner, in their grief needed an example of leadership that embodied Christ's teachings and could quite possibly have ministered to that partner and brought them out of their sin and unto redemption.

        When the pastor in this matter agreed to an interview and then hid in his church behind a locked door once the press arrived, per his agreement to speak with them, he showed us what he is and is not when he calls himself minister.
        Tragically, there are far too many of those in this world. And they shall answer to God for their failings in his name.

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        • #5
          From reading the article

          ...it gives the impression that the church was being used for the service and not that the pastor was giving the eulogy.....

          So, if the pastor was to give the eulogy, by all means give the gospel message. The deceased has already been judged. If they want to use a , I am assuming, a fundamentalist church then give the biblical message where the lost and save go.

          If only the church building was to be used that is a tougher call. It is just a building where sinners congregate- some who know Christ and others who don't....the Spirit can move anywhere and at any time. Yet, I feel differently if it was for a same sex 'wedding'

          I don't buy the reason for the church being selected- I wouldn't be surprised to hear of a lawsuit next.

          They were holding a wake??? No large Catholic Churches in the area? In Tampa?

          Here is the news clip.

          http://www.blackchristiannews.com/20...ng-homosexual/

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          • #6
            True, the pastor jumped the gun before checking things out first but in the end he did the right thing IMO.

            With hundreds of mourners in attendance no doubt a few friends would have shared memories about the deceased which would have included personal relationships. The pastor would have no control over those testimonies. I believe the church would have been in danger of being used as a public soapbox to project a wholesome image of the man's relationship {marriage?} with another man as equal to the biblical norm. The word "love" would have been used endlessly to bury any scriptural objections to the lifestyle. Christians once again would be manipulated into silence, which is a major goal of the organized gay agenda.

            The mother running to the media is a big red flag for me. There are many, many liberal churches that welcome & promote the homosexual lifestyle and could easily accommodate a large gathering. I'm wondering why she sought a conservative, fundamentalist church to preform the service over those. Could it be she used the same tactic as deliberately choosing a Christian bakery to make a gay cake knowing they'll refuse then crying "bigot"?

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            • #7
              I agree that this was most likely a set up to further the homosexual agenda. The pastor should have found out more about the deceased and his lifestyle before he agreed to have the funeral at his church. Like Heather said, he should have gone ahead and given the eulogy, preaching about homosexuality being a sin and those who practice it don't get into heaven. Then it might get around the homosexual community that if you want to have your dead gay loved one's funeral at this church, you're going to have to sit through a biblical message on the evils of this particular sin. I'm thinking there will be few if anymore homosexual takers of funeral services at this church.

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              • #8
                I certainly don't think a funeral is the place for people to condemn the deceased. Nor do I think a funeral would be the appropriate venue for gays to trumpet the gay agenda. Nor do I believe we can presume that would have happened here. Yes, this may have been intended to issue forth the gay agenda by taking this funeral to this Baptist church and then chastising them for refusing to perform the service. But that didn't happen. And that means the agenda, if it did exist, was shut down.

                And no lawsuit can ever succeed to change that.

                Here's the thing though. Let's presume even further than we have on certain matters as pertains to this type funeral. A service to be performed for a man who was gay, who was not known to be gay when the funeral was agreed to by the pastor, and that was then refused once the sexual sin of the deceased was discovered by the pastor.

                What if every single church in America held to that same principle?

                No funerals for unrepentant gays.

                What then?

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                • #9
                  What if every single church in America held to that same principle?
                  Not likely given we are deep into the age of Laodicia where apostasy is growing rapidly.

                  At the end of the day it was the pastor's call and he did the right thing for his flock.
                  Last edited by BarbT; August 10th, 2014, 12:25 PM. Reason: spelling

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                  • #10
                    I still think an underlying oddity is that they approached the church at all; the pastor didn't know him, he didn't go to church there, and they are obviously very conservative. I do think the pastor did fine turning them away, as long as he learned not to agree to something that he should never have agreed to. I also think it is fine for a pastor that is invited to, to preach anything he wants at a funeral, IF he cleared it with the family beforehand. If the family rejects it, then it is their choice.

                    Thanks to sweeetlilgurlie on Narniaweb for the sig

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                    • #11
                      The video posted indicates

                      the family of the deceased grew up in that particular church. Homosexuality isn't the sin, but practicing the sin is. Perhaps the pastor knew he was a homosexual but was abstaining.......

                      The commentator is too much....he indicates the family was notified at the very last second, but in the video it was the night before and the family for the most part was able to notify everyone of the change of venue.

                      Hopefully the mother will be embolden to share the gospel message and that God says homosexuality is a sin. We don't judge to damnation, but we do share God's word.

                      I have family members that have chosen to ignore God's word and their eternal destination does not look good............but it is their choice and God will do the judging.....

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                      • #12
                        When my grandfather passed none of the priests were available to do the funeral. My grandparents were catholic. My mother convinced my grandmother to let our pastor do the funeral. I remember sitting there as he preached the Gospel in the funeral home. A funeral is a very captive audience!

                        I understand the pastor's stance. If he was giving the eulogy, I believe he should have let it continue and just preach. If he was not giving the eulogy, I feel that he should have stepped up and found another place the family could have the funeral. Of course, hindsight is 20/20. I cannot speak to what this man's personal conviction was regarding the situation. I cannot blame him for what he did.
                        "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose" ~ Jim Elliot

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                        • #13
                          It's so hard in today's world to know the attitudes of the people involved. I still find it strange that even the family that attended the church, but the man did not, wanted to have his funeral there if they knew how conservative they were. I guess my conclusion is that we don't know enough of the situation, but it is obvious that some in the media are trying to make this into something (or it never would have been reported).

                          Thanks to sweeetlilgurlie on Narniaweb for the sig

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                          • #14
                            If the family of the deceased grew up in the church, doesn't it ring odd that they'd not know the pastors position should he find out this man was gay?

                            And how did they imagine this wouldn't come out? When a natural question in preparing for the service is to ask if the deceased was married. Answering, yes! And to a man then interjects the conflict here. But it is hard to imagine a pastor would get the details of the deceased's personal life the night before the funeral.
                            I think this family was hiding the facts that ended up coming out the day before the funeral was to take place. In which case, if so, that speaks to their own agenda.

                            Either way, he was buried and a ceremony was held at the same location as was the wake. For him it is over now.

                            I'd hope no one would argue a church should be forced to perform a funeral for a gay person. Just as they should never be forced to marry a gay couple.

                            Originally posted by M4EVERHIS View Post
                            the family of the deceased grew up in that particular church. Homosexuality isn't the sin, but practicing the sin is. Perhaps the pastor knew he was a homosexual but was abstaining.......

                            The commentator is too much....he indicates the family was notified at the very last second, but in the video it was the night before and the family for the most part was able to notify everyone of the change of venue.

                            Hopefully the mother will be embolden to share the gospel message and that God says homosexuality is a sin. We don't judge to damnation, but we do share God's word.

                            I have family members that have chosen to ignore God's word and their eternal destination does not look good............but it is their choice and God will do the judging.....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think many churches hold funerals for non-members often. Many times as a favor to someone who goes there. It might be more common than people realize.

                              I really feel bad for a pastor who does a funeral for someone they didn't know. And I feel worse for pastors who have to do a funeral for an unrepentant person who was a member of their church but lived like a non-Christian. To me it ends up being an hour of deceit and platitudes to make the family feel better. Most pastors won't come out and say that the persons salvation was doubtful.
                              "Therefore my beloved brothers, be steadfast, immovable,
                              always abounding in the work of the Lord;
                              knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain."

                              1 Corinthians 15:58 (ESV)

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